Hybrid Training Courses Effectively Develops Science Educators to Improve Teaching Skills, Build Supportive Communities and Engage in Undergraduate Education Reforms

Project No.
1022542
PI Name
Kelly Gull
Institution
American Society for Microbiology



Abstract 1

Hybrid Training Courses Effectively Develops Science Educators to Improve Teaching Skills, Build Supportive Communities and Engage in Undergraduate Education Reforms

Presentation Type
Poster
Team
Kelly A. Gull, American Society for Microbiology


Need

Originally, the Biology Scholars Program (BSP), managed by the American Society for Microbiology, was developed to satisfy the needs of a select community of educators who attend the American Society for Microbiology Conference for Undergraduate Educators (ASMCUE). The conference serves over 350 science educators interested in developing their teaching skills to improve student learning. Many of the experienced faculty in attendance were interested in determining if their active-learning techniques were truly having an impact on student learning. The BSP was developed to help these educators improve their skills in assessing student learning, designing classroom research, writing their results for disciplinary education journals, and becoming leaders in education reform.

Goals

The BSP was created to empower biologists to be leaders in science education reform, to expand and support a highly interactive community of educators committed to scientific teaching and the scholarship of teaching and learning, and to catalyze deep networks among life science professional societies to collectively engage in sustained undergraduate education reform.

Approach

Participants are selected through an application process to attend one of three different 12-month hybrid training programs. Candidates use a listserv, a wiki workspace, and webinar technology to complete individual and team assignments and to network with their cohort. After five months of online work, Scholars meet face-to-face for a 4-day intensive training institute led by peer facilitators. Post-institute, Scholars continue with monthly online assignments and check-ins before the final face-to-face capstone training that focuses on leadership in the field.

Outcomes

Scholars contribute directly to the discipline by (i) disseminating research about undergraduate learning via presentations at regional and national and meetings, (ii) becoming ambassadors of education research to their life science professional societies, and (iii) assuming leadership roles in education research. The ultimate impact of the program includes supporting and empowering scholars to (i) contribute to the larger base of knowledge about student learning, (ii) build a community of practitioners locally and nationally, (iii) lead undergraduate education reform efforts in scholar disciplines and professional societies, and (iv) increase the value placed on discipline-based education research at the institutional level.

Broader Impacts

BSP participants have produced over 175 publications and 100 presentations related to their education research. The wide-spread dissemination of education research methods and results increases exposure to and buy-in from the science education community. In addition, the BSP training model has proven�via iterative post-program surveys�to be successful way to recruit, train, and support educators. The model has since been applied to other ASM programs such as a hybrid course for international, limited-resource educators and to an online-only program for graduate and postdocs interested in teaching careers. In both cases, participants attend webinar trainings, complete online pre- and post-assignments, and network with facilitators and each other. To date, over 150 future faculty in the ASM Science Teaching Fellows Program have been trained in active-learning, assessment techniques, and career development using these methods. Not only has the BSP had an impact on the science education community, but its model continues to be a guide for many other successful training programs.

Unexpected Challenges

The largest challenge lies in convincing institutions to provide equal recognition for teaching excellence just as scientific research is rewarded within the discipline. The best way we found to address this in the Scholars program is to provide leadership training for participants along with recognition from a disciplinary society. Preparing faculty for leadership roles at their institutions where they can affect change in the culture offers the best success.

Citations

Biology Scholars have produced more than 175 publications and 100 presentations related to their education research. Below is a sampling (26) of 2014 & 2015 publications by Scholars.

Brigati, J. R., and J. M. Swann (2015). Facilitating Improvements in Laboratory Report Writing Skills with Less Grading: A Laboratory Report Peer-Review Process. Journal of Microbiology & Biology Education 16(1), 61-68. DOI: 10.1128/jmbe.v16i1.884

Dewsbury, B. M. (2015). Debating the Role of Higher Education in Society. Journal of Microbiology & Biology Education 16(1), 96-97. DOI: 10.1128/jmbe.v16i1.900

Gyure, R. A. (2015). Comprehensive Cyanobacteria Review for Both the Classroom and Laboratory. Journal of Microbiology & Biology Education 16(1), 97. DOI: 10.1128/jmbe.v16i1.903 https://dx.doi.org/10.1128/jmbe.v16i1.903

K. S. Jagger, and Furlong, J. (2014). Infusing Bioethics into Biology and Microbiology Courses and Curricula: A Vertical Approach. Journal of Microbiology & Biology Education 15(2),213-217. DOI: 10.1128/jmbe.v15i2.783

Jandu N. (2015). Introductory Immunology: Begin the Journey. Journal of Microbiology & Biology Education 16(1), 94-95. DOI: 10.1128/jmbe.v16i1.899

Liao M.-K. (2015). An Integrated View of the One-Health Movement: The Oneness of Human Health. Journal of Microbiology & Biology Education 16(1), 99. DOI: 10.1128/jmbe.v16i1.913

Parks, S. T. (2015). Microbial Life in a Winogradsky Column: From Lab Course to Diverse Research Experience. Journal of Microbiology & Biology Education 16(1), 82-84. DOI: 10.1128/jmbe.v16i1.847
Segarra, V. A., and Tanner, S. (2015). Comparing Outdated and Updated Textbook Figures Helps Introduce Undergraduates to Primary Literature.
Journal of Microbiology & Biology Education 16(1), 90-92. DOI: 10.1128/jmbe.v16i1.892

Westenberg, D. (2015). 'Microbial Diversity': A Journey through Carl Woeseメs Tree of Life. Journal of Microbiology & Biology Education 16(1), 98-99. 10.1128/jmbe.v16i1.912

Yeong F. M. (2015). Use of Constructed-Response Questions to Support Learning of Cell Biology during Lectures. Journal of Microbiology & Biology Education 16(1), 87-89. DOI: 10.1128/jmbe.v16i1.890

Carroll, M. A. (2014). Teaching Scientific Ethics Effectively at Any Level. Journal of Microbiology & Biology Education 15(2), 247-248. DOI: 10.1128/jmbe.v15i2.749

Gabriel, S. E. (2014). A Modified Challenge-Based Learning Approach in a Capstone Course to Improve Student Satisfaction and Engagement. Journal of Microbiology & Biology Education 15(2), 316-318. DOI: 10.1128/jmbe.v15i2.742

Govindan, B. (2014). Moral Games Teach Bioethics at Any Level. Journal of Microbiology & Biology Education 15(2), 2. DOI: 10.1128/jmbe.v15i2.807
Rybarczyk, B. J., Walton, K. L. W., and Grillo. W. H. (2014). The

Development and Implementation of an Instrument to Assess Studentsメ Data Analysis Skills in Molecular Biology. Journal of Microbiology & Biology Education 15(2), 259-267. DOI: 10.1128/jmbe.v15i2.703
Jandu, N. (2014). Getting to Know Your Microbiota in Health and Disease. Journal of Microbiology & Biology Education 15(2), 338. DOI: 10.1128/jmbe.v15i2.772

Kiely, J. K. (2014). Online Resources for Introducing Bioethics through Case-Studies and Active Learning. Journal of Microbiology & Biology Education 15(2), 249-250. DOI: 10.1128/jmbe.v15i2.804
Martin, M. O. (2014). Overuse of Antibiotics: A Voice (with Multiple
Agendas) Crying Out in the Microbial Wilderness. Journal of Microbiology & Biology Education 15(2), 337-338. DOI: 10.1128/jmbe.v15i2.793
Yung, S. B., and T. P. Primm. (2014). Active Learning for Basic Metabolic Pathways. Journal of Microbiology & Biology Education 15(2), 319-320. DOI: 10.1128/jmbe.v15i2.752

Segarra, V. A., Birnbaum, M. D., Ort�z-Rosado, A., L�pez-Rodr�guez, D., Varona, V., Ji Zha, Fiedler, S., Azaizeh, W., and Autore, H. (2014). Experiential Posters: Theatrical and Improvisational Tools Aid in Science Museum Outreach. Journal of Microbiology & Biology Education 15(2), 313-315. DOI: 10.1128/jmbe.v15i2.741

Sleister, H. M. (2014). Evidence-Based Strategies to Improve Memory and Learning . Journal of Microbiology & Biology Education 15(2), 336-337. DOI: 10.1128/jmbe.v15i2.790

Walton K. L. W. (2014). Using a Popular Science Nonfiction Book to Introduce Biomedical Research Ethics in a Biology Majors Course. Journal of Microbiology & Biology Education 15(2), 240-242. DOI: 10.1128/jmbe.v15i2.767

Wegman-Geedey, D. L. (2014). Introducing Undergraduates to Global Health Epidemiology, Emerging Infectious Diseases, and Parasitology: A Small Book with a Big Impact. Journal of Microbiology & Biology Education 15(2), 335-336. DOI: 10.1128/jmbe.v15i2.791

Wernick, N. L. B., Ndung'u, E., Haughton, D., and Ledley, F. D. (2014). Positioning Genomics in Biology Education: Content Mapping of Undergraduate Biology Textbooks. Journal of Microbiology & Biology Education 15(2), 268-276. DOI: 10.1128/jmbe.v15i2.724
Abdullah, C., Parris, J., Lie, R., Guzdar, A., and Tour, E. (2015). Critical Analysis of Primary Literature in a Masterメs-Level Class: Effects on Self-Efficacy and Science-Process Skills. CBE Life Sciences Education. 14(3). DOI: 10.1187/cbe.14-10-0180

Stanton, J. D., Neider, X. N., Gallegos, I. J., and Clark, N. C. (2015). Differences in Metacognitive Regulation in Introductory Biology Students: When Prompts Are Not Enough. CBE Life Sciences Education 14(2). DOI: 10.1187/cbe.14-08-0135

Archer, E. K. (2014). American Society of Plant Biologists: Position Statement on the Education of Young Children about Plants
CBE Life Sciences Education13(4): 575ヨ576. DOI: 10.1187/cbe.14-09-0150



Project Page